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Welcome to Diary of a Wimpy Con.  Thank you very much for visiting. Please feel free to read and comment - nothing makes me happier than participation.


My goal in starting this blog is to provide a forum for those facing prison time, those already serving time, and the families of defendants and felons.  It is a difficult process for all concerned when you or a loved one becomes a defendant in the criminal justice system or goes off to jail. Regret, remorse, fear, separation, rejection, despair: these can be overpowering emotions. It helps to have a place to turn. I anxiously await all your comments, criticisms and contributions. Blogging is a two-way street after all.  

My first impulse after all my troubles started was to crawl under a rock and withdraw from the world.  Society labels felons as bad, unworthy people. I used to agree.  But now that I find myself on the other side of the fence I realize that, though I may have done wrong, that does not, automatically, make me a bad person. So I am now coming out, coming clean. By chronicling my journey, I hope to put a human face on an inhuman system and to discourage others from following in my footsteps.  If through my writing I can prevent even one person from committing a crime, than my work will have been worth it.

In addition, I plan to air my thoughts on the criminal justice system, courts and prisons. Because my crime was a non-violent, White-collar crime involving fraud, my natural focus will be on white collar crimes, criminals and victims.

You may be wondering about the name of my blog, Diary of a Wimpy Con.  The fact is, I'm a mild-mannered wimp, a regular, unassuming guy - hence the name of this blog.  While the prospect of prison terrifies me, it should be interesting for readers to live vicariously through me to learn how a meek, gullible guy manages to survive. In my several remaining months of freedom I plan to post on my experiences with the criminal justice system, discuss my wrongdoing and delve into my thoughts and feelings during this difficult time. Once in prison, the focus will shift to life behind bars.  

As you may know, prisons are still in the dark ages when it comes to technology. This project would not be possible without the help of devoted friends and family members who have graciously agreed to manage this site, post my missives and forward me comments.  

I look forward to hearing from you. Please also provide your e-mail on the home page so that you can receive my posts as they occur.

2 comments:

  1. Hi, Leigh. I heard your story on Snap Judgment (via PRX.org), and found it interesting, if rather nerve-wracking. I could hear the anxiety in your voice as it was recorded. I hope you've now had time to "bottom out" and that things will gradually improve for you, despite the incarceration.

    I've often wondered what it's like "on the inside", having never faced anything more severe than a minor traffic ticket. Like most people "on the outside", I've wondered how I'd cope with incarceration, and what I'd do with the time. Writing was always what I figured I'd do if I were ever in such a situation. I am glad to see you have that opportunity, and I look forward to reading your blog. (As of this comment, I just got here.)

    Fortunately for me, I've managed to stay out of any such trouble, but I did have four or five days as a psychiatric inpatient once. Just that minor episode was an eye-opener.

    I wish you well, and salute you for being candid and owning up to what you did. Here's hoping that things will look up for you in the long term.

    Regards,

    ~Rob Shinnick (an overnight hotel desk clerk in Georgia)

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  2. Hi, Leigh.
    I also heard your story on Snap Judgement.
    I appreciate your honesty and transparency.

    If you'd like to talk to a guy in Seattle, contact me.
    I'll give you my phone number if you'd like.

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